Wednesday, September 22, 2010

What does it take to be an ag blogger?

This is a tough world!  The Internet is a big, scary place.  It takes some real guts to do what ag bloggers do.  It takes class and savvy!  So, what does an ag blogger need to equip themselves for the mission of agovcating?  Well, let's take a lesson from my very own Twitter account.

Agricultural bloggers need to be organized.

When blogging about agriculture, you need to have some idea of what you're talking about.  You need to understand the operations you discuss.

You need to be practical.  You need to know what is both possible and beneficial for your blog, for agriculture, for the people you represent.  You need to be able to have realistic ideas.  You should also be sure that you always have the right tools...being well-equipped is always practical.

You need to be willing to do what it takes to spread the message you want to spread.  At any time.  Ever.

You need to be sharp.  If you don't know it, find it out.  If you can't find it out, do the best you can to get by.  Don't be afraid to admit what you don't know, but have confidence in what you do know.  Always portray yourself as an intelligent and capable person!

You need to be both peaceful and composed.  You can't be partaking in shenanigans all the time, that's just not classy.  You need to portray the utmost professionalism on your blog.

That goes hand-in-hand with the fact that there should always be a level of seriousness...even in light-hearted posts.  Blogging is serious business.

Maturity.  Maturity is a huge factor.  Agriculture needs mature, capable agvocates!

You need to be able to be your own problem-solver.  The ability to figure things out on your own is valuable, both in the blogging world and in "real life."  Problem-solving skills can go a long way in farming and ranching.  They can be a huge asset in blogging.

You need to be cultured.  Audiences like sophisticated people.  Understand pop culture, and it doesn't hurt to have a feel for high society.

Okay.

If you learn anything from this post, it's this:  have a sense of humor.  Be yourself.  Be willing to make fun of yourself.  Blogging should not be high-stress; if it is, you're doing it wrong.  There may be a high-stress post here and there, but blogging, as whole, is a hobby for 90% of the population.  It's a way to get your voice out there on behalf of your cause.  In my case, I'm blogging to show that agriculture is an industry full of unique, amazing, and wonderful people.  I'm blogging to share my agriculture story, as only a dorky 20-something college kid can.

Do it your way.  And don't be afraid to laugh.

I do want to end on a slightly more serious note, though.

A blogger should always, always be appreciative.  To their readers, to their supporters, to the friends and family and significant others who may or may not get it.  Always show appreciation to the people in your life.  Things have been very stressful for me lately, between person life issues and the transition of coming back to college.  I can't tell the people who support me, how much I appreciate them.  I can try to, though.  In fact, I've done it a few times via tweet.

So, with those takeaways for the post, I leave you with these:

Thanks guys.  Keep it funny.  Keep it real.  Keep it you.  And keep it appreciative.  Good luck as everyone continues harvest!

7 comments:

  1. lol Sarcasm however doesn't carry well - especially when (I have) those days where it's like razor blades followed by a salt treatment. (OK one of those days I elected to *not* post every thing I was thinking!!!)

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  2. This is great! I love the tweet insertions as examples and their organization makes the post easy to read. Plus the tweets in contrast to the text copy are funny:) Thanks again.
    John

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  3. This is good - Very good! Thanks for taking the time to put that together. I like your style!

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  4. @Jan,
    Sarcasm is a dangerous tool; if used correctly with the right audience, it's wonderful, but at the same time you can never be 100% who is reading or who will take it literally. For that reason, I try to keep sharper sarcasm (which I can be known for at times) off my blog and within personal conversations. I've learned once or twice that sarcasm on SM can often come back to haunt you!

    @John,
    Thank you, sir! Aside from video, this was one of the most involved posts and written, and probably had the most planning and forethought.

    @Mark,
    I like that you like me style! That is a fantastic compliment, and I deeply appreciate it.

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  5. I totally agree with @Mark Jewell, I like your style!

    Instead of boring and hard to digest, it's like having a younger female version of Mike Rowe, getting the message out in an enjoyable way. =)

    How can it get any better than that? LOL

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  6. @Penny...comparing me to Mike Rowe is probably one of the most gratifying compliments I could EVER receive in regards to my blog. Thank you, so very much!

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  7. Great style and insight-thanks for encouragement

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